What Americans Really Watch on Super Bowl Sunday

Publicis New York's Jesse Samberg talks alternative programming

Jesse samberg header

The most recent United States Census estimates the American population at more than 322 million. And America’s biggest annual TV event, the Super Bowl, sees just over a third of the country tune in. This audience is glued to screens in their living rooms and bars for more than five hours when you factor in the extended halftime show – practically every brand marketer’s wet dream. In fact, a large number of brands have either already released their Super Bowl spots (Skittles, Mountain Dew, Kia) or have teased what’s coming (Bud Light, Taco Bell, Butterfinger) not only to tee up this transfixed audience, but also as part of a larger, web- or social-based ecosystem with easily accessible and relevant content available whenever consumers want it. In this way, brands are betting the value of their Super Bowl spot is a part of their total marketing universe, but will play the most crucial role in creating buzz and conversation, generating leads, and ultimately, driving purchase consideration.

But what about the two thirds or nearly 200 million Americans that don’t plan to watch the Super Bowl? According to the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project, 74% of these Americans who are online use social media sites.[1] They want content tailored to their interests, and you can bet they want to talk about it.

Read the rest on Little Black Book.

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